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Basic Macrame Knots and Techniques

 

Macrame is a simple and enjoyable craft that requires just a few simple instruments and a basic understanding of a few knots. This lesson shows you how to tie seven popular macramé ties that you can use to make a variety of macramé crafts by combining them.

Try to use items you already have for your first creative project to save money. It would help if you were assured that you would like this hobby before investing considerable money. Choose one of the thread types or one of the mounting rings from the list of available alternatives. Consider exploring your house for a whiteboard that might be used as a workstation for the day. To keep your string from slipping off the board, you may buy macrame pegs. On the other hand, safety pins might be utilized for your first project to save some money.

Lark's Head Knot 

For fastening your macramé strands to a rod or ring, the Lark's Head Knot is one of the most common knots.

  1. Make a loop with one macramé cord by folding it in half.
  2. Lay the folded wire on the work area so that the loop is facing down and the ends of the cord are facing up.
  3. Lay your rod (or ring) on the folding cord, slightly above the loop, and secure with a nut.
  4. Wrap the loop over the dowel and secure it (or ring).
  5. Pull the ends of the rope up and into the loop and pull it down to tighten the whole thing.

Reverse Lark's Knot 

In its simplest form, the Reverse Lark's Head knot (also known as the Cow Hitch Tie) is the Lark's Head braid as it looks from the other side. Choosing between the Lark's Head and the Reverse Lark's Head knots is purely a personal choice since they are almost identical in appearance.


 

  1. Fold a single macramé strand in half lengthwise.
  2. Lay the folding cord on the work area so that the loop is facing up and the ends of the cord are looking downward.
  3. Lay your dowel (and ring) over the folding cord, slightly above the loop, and secure with a nut.
  4. Bring the loop down over the shaft (or ring).
  5. Pull the ends of the rope up and into the loop and pull it down to tighten the whole thing.

Half Knot 

When making a sinnet (notice the unique phrase!), half knots are frequently utilized as the starting point. Half Knots form a natural spiral often utilized in plant hanger crafts when tied together. To complete the Half Knot, four cords are needed. The knotting wires and the knot-bearing cords are made up of two cords on each side of the knotting cords.


 

  1. Cross the left plaiting cord over the twin knot-bearing cords and below the right knotting cord, then bring the left braided rope cord to the right.
  2. Cross the right plaiting cord across the left knotting cord, bringing it beneath the two knot-bearing strands on the left side. 3.
  3. Pull the knotting cords together to tighten the knot.

Square Knot 

The Square Tie is indeed a progression of a Half Knot in its design and function. In this case, "half of a square" means "half of the square." Consequently, you begin by forming the first half knot as you would any other, and then you complete the square by forming another half tie using the opposite strands.


 

  1. Complete the Half Knot by following steps 1-3 shown above.
  2. Cross the right knotting cord over the twin knot-bearing cords and beneath the left knotting cord, then bring the right plaiting cord to the left.
  3. Pulling the left knotting rope to the right and over the middle knotting cord will allow the knotting cord to be tightened properly.
  4. Pull the knotting cords together to fasten them.

Half Hitch Knot 

The Half Hitch Tie is available in several different variants. It can be worked in several ways for different effects, including horizontally, vertically, and diagonally, with various plaiting and knot-bearing cords. Half-Half Hitch Knots may be tied from left to right and the right to the left. This knot is among the most used macrame knots because of its simplicity and adaptability.

Double Half Hitch

A double half hook knot is two half hook knots that are worked together with one after another. "Clove Hitch" is another name for this kind of connection. Half Hitch tie versions described here may be performed as the double half-hitch simply repeating the knotting procedures once more after the first.

Horizontal Half Hitch  

The knot-bearer in this example is the cord on the left, and the knotting cord is the cord on the right, as shown in the diagram. Depending on the design, which cables are assigned for which purposes may differ; nonetheless, this information should be included in your project specifications.

 

To work the parallel half hook from right to left, follow the simple steps outlined above, but instead of using the right-most cable as the knot-bearing cord, use the next-to-left cord as the knotting cord instead.


Diagonal Half Hitch  

In the Diagonal Half Hitch, the knot-bearing thread is held diagonally first before stitches are worked, while the Horizontal Split Hitch is held horizontally before the threads are done.

To work the diagonally half hitch straight right to left, follow the steps outlined above, but instead of utilizing the right-most thread as the knot-bearing cord, use the cord immediately following it on the left as the plaiting cord.


 

Vertical Half Double Hitch  

The vertical dual half hitch is often made using a separate, lengthy knotting rope that is started back and forth through numerous knot-bearing strands to form the knot. Wall hangings and other items that need a thick cloth are often made using a succession of vertical double hitch knots to produce dense columns of vertical knots. This method is a fantastic way to include a bright contrast color into a project.


 

The illustration to the right illustrates a vertical dual half hitch that goes from left to right.

  1. Begin with the knotting cord(s) behind the knot-bearing cord(s), with a short end to one side and a longer end to the other side 
  2. Bring the outer edge of the knotting rope up over the knot carrying cord, pushing this to the left as you do this.
  3. Using the outer edge of the plaiting cord, wrap it around the rear of the braided cord, bringing it up through to the gap produced between the two strands to complete the knot.
  4. Complete the vertical double halfway hitch by repeating steps 2 and 3.

Overhand Knot 

It is a regular daily knot you have most likely tied a hundred times before realizing this had a name! It is a nice knot to secure the cords for a plant hanger or at the top of a braid.


 

  1. The first step is making a loop by crossing the end of the string over the other.
  2. Bring one end of the cable at the top of the loop up and through the loop. 3. Tighten all ends of a cord to ensure that it is secure.

Gathering Knot 

A Gathering Knot is an attractive and functional method when you want to bring numerous cords together. Depending on the situation, this tie is often employed at the very start or end of a plant's hanger project. The knotting cord is a small cord used to tie the knots, and the knot-bearing cords are a group of cords used to hold the knots in a project.


 

  1. Bend a loop around one end of a knotting string and tie it with a knot.
  2. Position the loop upon the top of the knot-bearing cords, with the loop facing up and the short end of the cord pointing downward.
  3. Keeping the loop in position, wrap the outer edge of the plaiting cord securely around the knot carrying cords, wrapping from of the bottom up until the required length is reached, leaving the top of the loop visible above the wraps.
  4. Insert the end of the knotting cord at the top of the wrap into the loop.
  5. Pull the rear end of the tying cord to drag the loop down into the wrap.

Trim the exposed ends of the knotting cord to be near the wrap.